The ‘Eastrail 177’ Trilogy Is One of the Underrated Best Comic Book Trilogies of All Time

It wasn’t until about a couple of weeks ago that I watched Split for the first time. I had seen the commercials, my mother watched it and said that it was surprisingly good, and when my sister and I finally saw it to say we were horrified is an understatement.

Split, which follows the story of three teenage girls abducted by a man who has twenty-three personalities, is one of the best thrillers I’ve ever seen. The film doesn’t mess around with boring details or a storyline that chooses to take its own time before getting to the nitty-gritty. No, this movie keeps you on your toes from the very beginning and doesn’t let up the gas until by the conclusion you are staring at the screen in sheer horror.

After Split, we had to see where the story was going to go in last year’s finale of the trilogy, Glass. Unsurprisingly, Glass was just as riveting, in an albeit quieter fashion. We get to see M. Night Shyamalan’s (the writer/director of the trilogy) main characters–David Dunn (Bruce Willis), Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson), and Kevin Crumb (James McAvoy)–come together in the trilogy finale in a story that leads to the very unexpected.

The ending is a bit controversial among fans of the trilogy who were expecting the norm but honestly, I think this trilogy created by M. Night Shyamalan is a work of art. Continue reading The ‘Eastrail 177’ Trilogy Is One of the Underrated Best Comic Book Trilogies of All Time

‘Hamilton’ Is the Proof of How a Story Should Be Made

Ever since I watched Hamilton for the first last Friday I have not been able to get the film out of my very being. I’ve seen it three times since and I just can’t get enough of this story. The detail is insane, the talent is utterly incredible and really rewarding to see when entertainment can be so artificial these days, but with my latest viewing on Thursday night I couldn’t help noticing how spot on this story is.

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The play heavily features the stories of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, friends turned political foes over the course of twenty-four years, who are played brilliantly by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Leslie Odom Jr.

With basic storytelling, Hamilton could’ve easily been the clear protagonist while Burr should’ve been the easy villain. Instead, Miranda provides a story that sees Burr as a victim to Hamilton’s relentless pursuit of greatness and after a while, we can’t help but understand why Burr is so angry.

It’s the perfect example of writing a more realistic story that features characters who have good and bad in them, for every person has a light and a dark side, so to speak. Continue reading ‘Hamilton’ Is the Proof of How a Story Should Be Made