Category Archives: Movies

Why Am I Getting Excited for ‘Venom: Let There Be Carnage’?

I have watched Venom more times than I care to admit…okay I’ve seen it four times, and every viewing has never been all that fun. The beginning of the movie is boring, the end of the movie is boring, the only part that is somewhat entertaining is the middle section and that part doesn’t last very long.

The best thing about Venom however was the relationship between Tom Hardy’s Eddie Brock (I still think Brock is written for an actor younger than Hardy but Tom just had to make it work, same goes for Michelle Williams’ character) and Venom so I figured the sequel, with all of that origin story nonsense out of the way, had the potential to be kind of fun.

Then I saw Woody Harrelson’s character, a psychopath named Cletus Kasady who seems to have some sort of connection to Eddie Brock (Brock probably got him put in the asylum where he’s being confined) and he’s just laughable to look at. He already looks ridiculous and his hair looks even worse.

So, with that in mind, I didn’t feel the urge to see this Venom sequel but after watching G.I. Joe Origins: Snake Eyes this July my philosophy for the rest of the year has been, “Oh what the heck. It can’t be worse than Snake Eyes.”

Venom 2 TV Spot Features New Looks at Carnage and Shriek | CBR

So, in roughly two weeks time Venom: Let There Be Carnage will be coming out and I’m kind of excited to maybe see it. The first reactions for the film have been positive but they were from fans at a premiere fan-event for the movie. The main thing that sprung from the fans’ first viewing of the movie was the hype over the post-credit scene. Apparently, it’s big!

And judging from the leaked intel, well, it’s a massive game-changer and will undoubtedly lead to some HUGE implications for the future of Venom.

So yeah, I’m kind of intrigued to see this film. Will I ultimately see it? I’m still twiddling my thumbs over that but ultimately, I can’t wait to watch Spider-Man: No Way Home.

I thank you for reading and I hope you have a fantastic day.

‘Rambo: Last Blood’: Why Did People Say This Movie Was So Bad?

In terms of the Rambo movies, I’ve only seen the first one but boy is it great. Whenever it’s on television I watch it and the final scene with Rambo and his Colonel always makes me cry. It never fails.

So yeah, I know Rambo and that’s why I was scared to watch his latest movie which came out two years ago, Rambo: Last Blood.

How would I describe this movie? My sister, who I watched the film with yesterday, said it best: “It’s Taken meets rated-R Home Alone.” That’s not an exaggeration.

Rambo: Last Blood (2019) - IMDb

The movie moves along at a fair pace and actually produces a really good story that left me and my sister absolutely riveted/horrified. Then the film kind of devolved into a gore fest that wasn’t exactly exhilarating or all that fulfilling despite the film’s circumstances. When the movie ended my sister and I kind of looked at each other giggling because the last twenty minutes were so ludicrous.

I’m not saying the movie was bad. In fact, it was way better than I could’ve possibly expected. The end was a bit boring though and ultimately dampened the quality of the rest of the film.

3.5 out of 5 stars and 85 out of 100. It’s not the worst movie I’ve ever seen but it’s nowhere near the best either.

I thank you for reading and I hope you have a lovely day.

It’s Batman Day: Who’s Your Favorite Catwoman?

Catwoman, she’s one of the most iconic DC Comics characters of all time. She also happens to be one of my favorite comic book characters for her sleek catsuits, her unabashed flirtatious nature, and her incredible ability to kick serious butt. Several women have taken the mantle as the feline and very capable femme fatale and today, for this week’s Who’s Your Favorite? I thought she would be a perfect fit. Enjoy!

Julie Newmar

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The first major appearance for Catwoman was on the iconic 60s’ Batman series and the actress who brought her to life was Julie Newmar. I don’t know anything about this version of Catwoman but I couldn’t leave her off of the list considering that she holds so much importance to Catwoman’s time on the small screen.

Eartha Kitt

catwomaneartha

Before you had Wesley Snipes making history as Blade or Chadwick Boseman as Black Panther you had Eartha Kitt as the first African-American actress to play Catwoman in the 60s’ Batman series. She wasn’t playing the role of Batman’s love interest in the series but she was still able to kick some serious butt and pave the way for other black actresses to play the character (Halle Berry and Zoe Kravitz.) That’s pretty awesome.

Michelle Pfeiffer

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Michelle Pfeiffer is undoubtedly the most iconic version of the character. Transforming from a timid, glass-wearing secretary into a confident, dangerous and very alluring lady in a remarkably shiny catsuit with a whip, Pfeiffer is the best thing about Batman Returns.

Halle Berry

hallecatwoman

Okay…this is my first time seeing this version of Catwoman’s outfit and it’s definitely cool, especially, I’m sure, for guys, but unfortunately the only superhero film to ever be helmed by a black woman would be deemed one of the worst superhero movies of all time.

Anne Hathaway

annecatwoman

Anne Hathaway would be the next actress to squeeze into a tight black suit and catch Batman’s fancy as the fascinating Seline Kyle. Now, unlike the other Catwomen who were called Catwoman in their respective roles Nolan referred to her only as Selina, changing her storyline just a bit. Undoubtedly, she’s one of the best things about the film.

Camren Bicondova

youngcatwoman

And last but not least, there is Camren’s portrayal of the iconic character but what makes her so different is she is the only version that is shown as a teenager who grows up over a course of seasons on the show. That’s pretty cool.

And then, we’ll have Zoe Kravitz next. I can’t wait to see her as Catwoman. *squeal*

So, of these six versions of the iconic Catwoman, which is your favorite? For me, undoubtedly my favorite, despite Michelle’s clear iconicism, my favorite Selina is Anne Hathaway. I think she’s truthfully beautiful, I love her dagger heels, and plus, she’s part of Nolan’s films and I love his concept of these classic DC Comics characters.

I can’t wait to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

I thank you for reading and I hope you have a great day.

It’s Batman Day: ‘The Dark Knight’ Is Hands Down the Best Superhero Movie Ever Made

Have you ever seen a perfect movie? A movie so undeniably brilliant and spot on that the more you watch it the better it gets? A movie that’s so good that you kind of can’t believe it’s that incredible? The Dark Knight is that movie for me.

I don’t watch The Dark Knight often. But every so often I get the unshakable desire to see it. And so last night with that fervor upon me I decided to watch it.

For two hours and 32 minutes, I was sucked into the dark and demented world of Gotham where a man as horrifically twisted and brilliant as The Joker resides to wreak havoc on Gotham’s citizens for no reason other than pure amusement. And as the story slowly builds upon The Joker’s madness the movie gets better and better and better until one can only stare at the screen in appreciative awe.

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The Dark Knight is unlike any other superhero movie that’s been created. In fact, can we even say it’s a superhero movie? Batman isn’t exactly a hero, as the movie made clear. He’s just a man in a cynical world and sometimes the right choices mean you have to become the villain. Simple as that. But I guess that’s the reason why he’s a hero, right?

Continue reading It’s Batman Day: ‘The Dark Knight’ Is Hands Down the Best Superhero Movie Ever Made

‘Star Wars’ and the Marvel Cinematic Universe: The Art of the Great Third Act

Denis Villeneuve recently commented that MCU films are “cut and paste of one another” and even though I tried not to be, I got a little triggered. I understood what he meant and that he’s mostly correct but as an MCU fan I felt I had to defend a franchise that I loved so much.

What turned into a simple observational rant with my sister transformed into an epiphany as we realized the secret sauce for Star Wars and Marvel’s greatest third acts. And of course, I’m here to share that epiphany with you. Enjoy!

(This is a longread.)

For some, the MCU’s final acts can be a little stale. For years we have come to expect a story that finds a way to challenge the heroes in the film before reaching a climactic CGI-heavy battle that range from awesome and unforgettable to kind-of-underwhelming.

And while most of the time the third acts are my favorite portion of the film I understand some fans’ exasperation for this somewhat tiring formula. So why do some Marvel films stand out against others? Well, to understand the power of a third act let’s look at the Star Wars movies.

Star Wars: A New Hope followed the classic storytelling template of the Hero’s Journey with a young man going on a wild adventure to save a princess and becoming a hero by the conclusion of that story.

He became a hero, however, thanks to a climactic showdown that featured a giant weapon that had to be destroyed: the Death Star. It was a riveting story and when he managed to blow it up it’s one of the greatest moments in the franchise.

Since then, nearly every Star Wars movie has featured a weapon of some kind needing to be destroyed. Talk about repetitive!

Return of the Jedi, the first somewhat-disappointing Star Wars movie, featured an unfinished second Death Star that was the primary focus of the film. And of course, in repetitive fashion, the Rebel Alliance had to destroy it or the galaxy would be in turmoil.

The only thing that saved that third act from being the ultimate snooze fest was the riveting confrontation between Luke Skywalker, his father Darth Vader, and Palpatine. It was that personal touch that made the movie special and memorable.

You see, Luke fighting to save his father gave emotional gravitas to an ending that could’ve been kind of boring but his showdown with Palpatine was anything but boring because there was that personal connection.

That storyline with Vader and Luke honestly saved the movie because everything else was kind of so-so. Think about the rest of the films that feature massive third acts resulting in some sort of weapon needing to be destroyed.

The Phantom Menace, Trade Federation ship needs to be destroyed to save Naboo. The Force Awakens, the StarKiller Base (Death Star 3.0) needs to be destroyed. The Rise of Skywalker, a satellite needs to be destroyed to stop the Final Order from taking over the galaxy.

And even though Attack of the Clones doesn’t exactly have a weapon that needs destroying, its climactic battle held no personal connection to the characters. The same can be said with Solo: A Star Wars Story. The movie’s climax is boring because we don’t really care about Qi’ra’s story with Dryden, Han’s relationship with Beckett, or even Han’s connection with Qi’ra. So the end just kind of…happens.

You see the trend with these movies? The lack of the personal touch in these movies’ third acts make for somewhat a boring movie. And even though The Force Awakens is a great film it’s a copycat of A New Hope‘s entire structure.

Now let’s look at the best Star Wars movies and their incredible third acts.

Revenge of the Sith didn’t conclude with a massive space battle for the fate of the galaxy. It concluded with a very personal showdown between Anakin and Obi-Wan on Mustafar and across the galaxy we had the ultimate duel between the galaxy’s greatest Force-users, Yoda and Palpatine.

We feel so many feelings throughout the film’s final minutes because the trilogy has established a profound connection between these characters that when we see this lightsaber-duel conclusion it feels like it means something.

Padme dies, her children are born and separated, Yoda goes into exile, and the galaxy has actually been taken over by the Empire. It’s a somber ending but it is a fitting conclusion to the Prequel Trilogy.

Rogue One does have a very loooong climactic finale but the personal connection comes with Jyn’s determination to see her father’s plan realized. Plus, not only are the stakes very high but all of the characters die. It’s shocking, it’s emotional to watch, and it’s one of the more memorable endings in the franchise.

The Last Jedi is a mixture of both worlds. On one hand, it suffers terribly from the need-to-destroy-the-weapon storyline as Finn and Rose are assigned on a boring mission to find a way to disable the Dreadnaught’s hyperspace tracker. On the other hand, the film concludes with another personal showdown between Kylo and Snoke, then Rey and Kylo, and then finally Kylo and Luke. The film’s final twenty minutes are utterly fascinating and if the rest of the movie had found a way to exclude that ridiculous casino-detour and Poe’s annoying shenanigans, the movie would’ve been so much better.

The Empire Strikes Back is the perfect Star Wars movie because it takes the personal touch to a whole other level. The film’s biggest battle comes in the film’s first forty minutes on Hoth. After that, the story establishes the connections between the characters–Han and Leia’s burgeoning romance, Luke and Yoda’s master-and-apprentice dynamic–so that when the film’s third act arrives you’re so invested in these characters’ stories the movie becomes even more riveting.

Han gets frozen in carbonite which is a heartbreaking development for Leia. Luke faces Vader in an epic lightsaber duel that concludes with Skywalker losing his hand and a bombshell announcement, Vader is Luke’s father.

You can’t get more personal than that.

So yes, we have now established that a great third act must have a personal touch. Now let’s look at the MCU stories that actually follow this approach.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Guardians of the Galaxy, Captain America: Civil War, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War, and Endgame, just to name a few.

And what do all of these movies have in common? Their third acts are permeated with that personal touch.

Through all of the classic climactic explosions in The Winter Soldier, there’s a deeper emotional storyline as Captain America tries to save his friend, Bucky. Groot dies in Guardians of the Galaxy. Iron Man goes to town on Captain America and Bucky in Civil War because of their connection to the death of his parents. Black Panther‘s final act features a climactic showdown between cousins T’Challa and Killmonger. And Infinity War and Endgame‘s final acts features Thanos who, having already killed off some of favorite characters, raises the stakes to astronomical levels as we see The Avengers take him on, lose, then fight him again and win, only to lose Iron Man and Black Widow permanently in the process.

Now, let’s look at the MCU stories in Phase 4 so far.

solci lvs jude 🐉 on Twitter: "SPOILER #WandaVisionFinale . . . . . . Cómo  me recupero de esto? "you, vision, you are a piece of the mind stone that  lives in

WandaVision concludes with a bit of a boring CGI-showdown but it still manages to retain that personal connection to Wanda and her story of grief, making the series as a whole fit together rather nicely in that department.

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier ep 6 recap: MCU series ends with an  uneven but thrilling finale | Entertainment News,The Indian Express

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier‘s finale is very lackluster because:

1: There’s no real personal connection between the heroes and the villains.

2: Karli’s motivations are murky and hard-to-understand so the stakes don’t seem very high. Hence, the reason why the finale is so boring.

Loki finale: Kang the Conqueror, multiversal war, and other key takeaways |  Entertainment News,The Indian Express

Now, Loki gets it. Instead of having a massive showdown like I think we all expected it takes the very personal route with the introduction of He Who Remains, the man that destroyed Sylvie’s life. He tries to give Loki and Sylvie his job but she has no time for it, resulting in a fight/romantic moment between Loki and Sylvie that was anything but expected. Even the final moments with Ravonna and Mobius contain that emotional connection that makes their scenes interesting.

Review: 'Black Widow' Looks Back To The Future Of The MCU - Movie News Net

Black Widow‘s final act is slightly muddied by the CGI-explosion fest but it’s a very personal conclusion for Natasha Romanoff as she is forced to face off with Taskmaster, the man who destroyed her life General Dreykov, her fellow Black Widows, and she has to save her sister Yelena. It’s a powerful conclusion to her story in that film and a great origin story for Yelena at the same time.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings' Film Review: Marvel's  Martial-Arts Saga Nails the Characters and the Kicks

And even Shang-Chi, through the CGI-heavy dragon showdown, found a way to make the entire climactic third act personal with Shang-Chi’s connection to Wenwu and his realization of who he is by embracing the light and dark within himself. And guess what? Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings is one of the highest-rated superhero movies of all time.

So that’s it. That’s the secret sauce. If Marvel Studios and Lucasfilm can realize that their movies are best when their third acts are imbued with a personal touch there will always be a chance of getting a great movie.

I thank you for reading and I hope you have a great day.

‘King Arthur: Legend of the Sword’ Reiterated Why ‘Shang-Chi’ Is So Important

This isn’t going to be a long, profound post about Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Ring‘s important impact on the AAPI community. It’s merely an observation piece, albeit a brief one, that had me seething last night.

In fact, it made me so angry I decided to write this post. And this is why.

Le Roi Arthur de Guy Ritchie, un divertissement à la (dé)mesure de la  légende – Le Cri du Troll

In King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, a movie with an expected predominantly White cast there is an Asian character named George. In a sequence where Arthur and his buddies are telling a very convoluted story to a ranked soldier they mention George in a very derogatory fashion, calling him “Kung Fu George.”

My sister and I gasped. Mind you, this is a movie that came out just four years ago and yet the writers elected to treat its only Asian character in a demeaning way. So what he ended up becoming one of the Knights of the Round Table. They still slipped in an unnecessary form of racism.

Marvel's Kevin Feige addresses China's 'Shang-Chi' concerns, Fu Manchu

Fast forward to now and Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings is dominating the box-office and is the highest-rated superhero movie among audiences on Rotten Tomatoes with a 98% score. A movie with a predominantly Asian cast and a story that never shrinks from highlighting the vibrant and fascinating cultures of the AAPI community.

I’ve read so many posts about why Shang-Chi is so important. And when you think about films like 2017’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword or 2016’s The Great Wall–a movie starring Matt Damon that portrayed him as the savior of China–you realize that yes, we have a long way to go in terms of inclusivity but it’s nice knowing that Shang-Chi and all of the accompanying characters in that film exist to wash away the stereotypes.

I thank you for reading and I hope you have a lovely day.